The Shadow Queen by Anne Bishop Review

The Shadow Queen is the latest installment of the Black Jewels series, either Book 6 or Book 7 depending on whether you count only the novels or include the novella/short story collection.  It is a series in the loosest sense; the books are set in the same world and there is some overlap of characters and timeline, but some are designed to stand alone.

Anne Bishop

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Kick-Ass Female Authors and their Killer Heroines | NYCC Panel

Friday the 13th is the perfect day for Bookspotcentral Valentine to some wonderful women authors of paranormal fiction. Whether the label du jour is urban fantasy, dark fantasy, or some flavor of paranormal, with or without heavy romantic elements and (ahem) explicit hotness, these series can encompass high-octane thrills, layered world-creation, ensemble character development, humor, and cultural commentary. It’s that gusto and genre-bending variety that seems to attract its authors as well as its readers, and there were enthusiastic fans of both genders gathered at 2009’s New York Comic-Con to hear more about Kick-Ass Female Authors and their Killer Heroines.

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Whiskey and Water + Blood and Iron by Elizabeth Bear Review

Whiskey and Water is the second novel published in Elizabeth Bear’s series of the Promethean Age and should be considered as an independent sequel to Blood and Iron. The story of Whiskey and Water takes place about seven years after the events of Blood and Iron and it features many of the same characters – mostly in minor roles – with a decided emphasis on the magus Matthew Szczegielniak, formerly of the Prometheus Club.

Elizabeth Bear

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Swords and Dark Magic edited by Lou Anders and Jonathan Strahan Review

I grew up reading fantasy.  More than that, even, I had fantasy read to me before I could read for myself (clearly, I never had a chance).  There was a point, though, in adolescence, where I stopped reading epic, heroic, sword-wielding fantasy because it all seemed so…endlessly the same.  The irony of my timing (the mid-1990s) is that my giving up on the most mainstream part of the genre came at about the same time as the first glimmerings of a turning point into a darker and grimier place—the Martins and the Eriksons and so on.

Swords and Dark Magic

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Why I Write Science Fiction: An Apology – Alan DeNiro Guest Blog

I read a lot of pulp when I was a kid. Most of it was crap. I also wrote a lot of adventure stories and half-baked space operas, most of which were crap too. Around sixteen, I started writing poetry more seriously, and continued honing my poetry through high school, college, and an MFA. Sure, I would still write the occasional piece of fiction, but I thought the seismic shift away from fiction (especially science fiction, the literature of my youth) was permanent. Even with writing mentors that I respected, science fiction was considered the poor cousin on the other side of the valley, next to the river and railroad tracks.

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Petals of the Rat: loose notes for a new movement – Alan DeNiro Guest Blog

This isn’t a manifesto. This is a series of observations in a particular range of time, made on a mode of writing that I love, what on any given day can be called speculative fiction. Manifestos are the literary equivalent of knivings in a dark alley–sharp, fierce, with no hope of reprisal. The Futurists, after all, declared in their own manifesto that “the painting of nudes must be banned for 10 years.” Picasso, a few years later, said (pretty much ending debate on the subject): “When we love a woman we don’t start measuring her arms and limbs.” So much for the Futurists.

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Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman of Dragonlance – Interview

Boomtron is proud to introduce the Bestselling author tandem of Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman.  They were kind enough to answer some questions after just releasing their new book Bones of the Dragon (Dragonships of Vindras).

We are talking about the creators of Dragonlance!

dragonlance

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The Mosaic Novel – Guest Blog by Richard Bowes

When I decided to call From The Files Of The Time Rangers, a Mosaic Novel, I thought that the term was one that Jeff VanderMeer had invented for his brilliant multi-layered Veniss Underground. But when I ran into Jeff at Worldcon in Boston, he said it had originated with someone else but he didn’t remember who that was.

RichardBowes

My agent prefers the term ‘integrated collection’. But not only do I like the way Mosaic Novel sounds, I like the idea of a book created, as a visual mosaic is, out of bits of glass, of tiles, of colored stones.

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Join me or Die! : A Few Words on the Necessity of Dark Power – Guest Blog by Elizabeth Bear

Darth Vader is your father.

But you knew that already, didn’t you? Despite the power of those words to evoke a reaction of surprise – a shiver of fear, a frisson of titillation – don’t they provoke as well a shock of recognition, a deep sense of rightness and truth? The immediate response – anger, horror, denial – gives way to a realization of absolute veracity.

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Some Kind of Ride – Favorite Books of 2008

This will be brief.

As I’ve said before our strength lies in our diversity. If you want a unified chorus of voices singing hosannas to the pre-approved “best” books of the year then stop reading now — but if you want a ragged company of readers; readers with their own identity that shows in the books they choose, read and fight for then welcome home prodigal sons and daughters, the light is always on.

Here are our favorite reads of 2008. From 1959 to 2009 we got you covered.

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Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier Review

Daughter of the Forest is the debut of the New Zealand author Juliet Marillier and the first book in the widely acclaimed Sevenwaters Trilogy. It offers a deep-felt re-telling of “Six Swans”, an old folk tale that exists in many variations throughout Germany and Scandinavia. With this novel, which was awarded the 2001 American Library Association Alex Award, Marillier follows into the footsteps of such literary giants as the famous Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, who set his version of the tale of the swan brothers to paper in 1838.

daughter of the forest

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Patrick O’Leary Interview + Door Number Three Review

Behind Door Number Three is The Gift of The Impossible Bird…

When I decided to re-read Patrick O’Leary’s novels to see if they were as good as I remembered them to be I also set out to track him down. I wanted to see if he was still writing and if he had anything coming out as it had been awhile since we heard from him. I hoped that his pen wasn’t silent. After some digging around I heard from him and he agreed to talk to me and luckily he’s still writing. What follows is most of our discussion.

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The Secret History of Moscow by Ekaterina Sedia Review

History as it is written is full of holes, of secrets and of omissions. The so-called “secret histories”, fictional or otherwise, are the stories of the forgotten and the suppressed, the stories of those who have been deprived of a voice to tell their version of the past. Ekatarina Sedia’s The Secret History of Moscow is not a story about Moscow per se, but rather a novel about those broken and maladjusted people who lack a voice of their own and who don’t quite “fit” into our modern world of progress, improvement and self-realization.

Secret History of Moscow

Check out our interview with Ekaterina Sedia

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